The Hubby Hat

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When you ask your husband to model his new hat…

…He is bound to do something silly.  

Now to the real story.

Last spring, hubby left his toboggan (here in Montana a toboggan is a sled, but those silly North Carolina folks apply the word to winter headgear) laying on a table at the library.  It was never seen again.

So, I offered to knit him a new one.  Maybe not my smartest move, as he hassled me continually about when it would be finished.  I should have just made it incognito and then handed it to him when it came off the needles.  It would have been a much more peaceful knit.  

This was one of my ninja knits, but I was smart this go around and took notes so I can duplicate it.  I knit with Paton’s Classic Wool in worsted, holding two strands together as one.  Since I am notoriously cheap, I only bought one skein of yarn (on sale, with a coupon, of course) and seperated it into two equal balls.  It wasn’t quite enough, so even the not so decerning eye can see that the hat came up a bit short.  However, he says it is warm and we both like the style.  I plan to start a second version soon with the left over grey from Mr. Man’s hat (blog post to come) and an additional, matching skein I’ll pick up at JoAnn’s.  

In the Nursing Student gang, this sign means, “Oh, crap! I should have studied last night.”

The band and the crown are knit separately, with a tiny amount of crochet tossed into the mix. Maybe there is an official word for combining these techniques, but I usually refer to them as “fusion projects.”    

Irksome Issue

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As a seasoned fiber artist and a fairly obsessive knitter, I like to think I have it all together (at least in the creative realm).  My knitting/crocheting portfolio includes everything from sweaters to dolls and I usually believe there is nothing I can’t tackle.  


So when my middle son (age 15) asked for a new watch cap, I didn’t think twice about choosing a unique pattern and getting started.  The very pronounced rib is created by knitting in the back and creating a twisted stitch.  I was loving the results until last night when it came time to reverse my work so that the rib started jutting off at an angle.  From a distance it looks great, but up close…


A hole!  

Executing the turn was easier than I expected and is something I probably could have come up with myself if I had put a bit of thought in to it, but I obviously made a boo-boo.  Now I’m stuck with this irksome hole.  I absolutely despise ripping stitches when I knit, so I am hoping to minimize the damage when I block the hat.  If that doesn’t work, I’ll have to get out my trusty crochet hooks and hobble together a patch.  

I’ll give you an update when I blog the completed hat.  

The Story of a Hat (Abridged Version)

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Once-upon-a-time (like 5 minutes ago), this was a nice long post about how I found some yarn at a thrift store and made myself a hat.  


The yarn was heather grey and 60% wool, 40% acrylic and cost me a whooping $1.50.


I whipped the hat up with some ninja free-style knitting, left it on the counter for days before blocking it, then had a bugger of a time getting a good selfie.  


So I drank some mead. After which I came up with the wonderful idea of having my husband (who had also been drinking mead) photograph me in the hat.


He went all into an Austin Powers photo shoot routine.  And the results were interesting to say the least.


Then I waited another 24 hours, edited the photos and wrote a blog post.  Only to (completely sober) accidentally delete it.  

I like my hat.  The mead was tasty.  My brownies are cool enough to cut.  Thanks for reading and see you next time!